Tradescantia pallida Purple Queen
Tradescantia pallida Purple Queen

Tradescantia pallida Purple Queen

SKU: S77832
1 for $7.95
1 Review
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Quick Facts
Common Name: Purple Spiderwort
Hardiness Zone: 1-13S/W Exposure: Full Sun
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Blooms In: Aug-Oct
Height: 12-18" Spacing: 18"
Read our Growing Guide Ships as: 1 PINT 28.86 CU IN.
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Shipping Details Shipment begins in mid April 2017, depending on your zone. See shipping tab for details

Product Details

Product Details
This genus contains a number of widely-grown perennials but also a tender species, Tradescantia pallida. Its primary virtues are handsome foliage and an eagerness to colonize its immediate neighborhood by sending out leafy stems that root where they touch ground, quickly forming a lush mat. Our selection is called 'Purple Queen', and its succulent leaves are a rich deep shade that is garnished with small, tri-cornered pink blooms that come and go quickly throughout the summer. The trick with 'Purple Queen' is to find companions who will look better with its purple robe cast about their feet, then stick a plant in the same pot, bed, or basket and admire the result. Try Coleus, Strobilanthes, Artemisia, or Ipomoea to start. Full sun gets the most growth and the best color.

Shipping

Shipping

HOW PLANTS ARE SHIPPED

The size of the plants we ship has been selected to reduce the shock of transplanting. For some, this means a large, bareroot crown. Others cannot travel bareroot or transplant best if grown in containers. We ship these perennials and annuals in 1 pint pots, except as noted. We must point out that many perennials will not bloom the first year after planting, but will the following year, amply rewarding your patience. We ship bulbs as dormant, bare bulbs, sometimes with some wood shavings or moss. Shrubs, Roses, vines, and other woody plants may be shipped bareroot or in pots. The size of the pot is noted in the quick facts for each item.

WHEN WE SHIP

We ship our bulbs and plants at the right time for planting in your area, except as noted, with orders dispatched on a first-come, first-served basis by climate zone. Estimated dates for shipping are indicated in the Shipping Details box for each item. Please refer to the Shipping Details box to determine the earliest shipping time. Unless you specify otherwise, fertilizers, tools, and other non-plant items are shipped with your plants or bulbs. Please supply a street address for delivery. Kindly contact us with two weeks notice, if you'll be away at expected time of delivery.

OUR GUARANTEE

We guarantee to ship plants that are in prime condition for growing. If your order is damaged or fails to meet your expectations, we will cheerfully replace or refund it. Please contact our Customer Service Department at 1-800-503-9624 or email us at [email protected]. Please include your order number or customer number when contacting us.

Reviews

Reviews

Average Customer Rating: (1 Review) Write a Review

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Summer out, winter in, always good

Peg from St. Joseph, Michigan

In SW Michigan (z6b): I overwinter this as a houseplant, then put cuttings (rooted or not) in my south-facing planter box. The site gets warm, but this stuff increases well, and spills over the edge. Looks good with whites and hot pinks. If the cats rampage through it, the succulent stems break, but I push the pieces in the soil and most root again. It's not as breakable as, say, impatiens. As a houseplant, it likes sun but survives in a north window. In last year's mild winter, a few bits survived outside, close to the house.

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Growing guide

Growing guide

Pronunciation: tra-des-cant'ee-a 

Vigorous and all but carefree in full sun or partial shade (partial shade is a requirement in the West). Tradescantia grows in almost any kind of soil, from damp to dry, but evenly moist soil is required in the dry areas of the South and West.

Plants may look tired by midsummer. If cut back almost to the ground, they will soon produce a fresh crop of foliage and may bloom again in the fall. In the Deep South, plants may go dormant in summer, resuming growth in winter.

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