All posts by Shantelle Brignolo

Cape Primrose 'Grape Ice'

Our Staff Favorites for Holiday Gifting (and Receiving!)

Each year, we ask a handful of our staff members to choose their favorite gifts from among our holiday offerings. Some select classic, tried-and-true treasures including our bestselling Canella Berry Wreath or Basket, premium Amaryllis, or fragrant Lily-of-the-Valley. Others cannot resist the lure of the new, and they select one of the season’s latest discoveries. We hope some of these favorites help you select some of your own for giving and receiving. If you have questions or could use some assistance with your shopping, email us at [email protected], phone 1-800-411-6159, or opt into live chat on our website. Order soon. Supplies of some of these gifts are limited.

Read some of the reasons these are our favorites:

Tiny Trumpets Bulb Collection
Tiny Trumpets Bulb Collection

NEW! Tiny Trumpets Bulb Collection
“I am so excited, I cannot wait to see this bloom in my house! What a treat to see my favorite colors blooming together while winter weather is knocking at my window.”
Alyson

Canella Berry Table Basket
Canella Berry Table Basket

Canella Berry Table Basket
“I received it about a week before Christmas last year, watered as instructed and placed it on a corner end table in my living room. The fresh scent filled the room but was not overbearing. I left it out until March. Still not losing any of its fresh scent, I did not toss it out but put in it on a tray in a hall walk-in closet and cannot believe that after almost a year, it still has its fresh scent. I open that closet everyday just to smell it. I LOVE THIS THING.”
Donna

Amaryllis 'Aphrodite'
Amaryllis ‘Aphrodite’

Amaryllis ‘Aphrodite’
“This Amaryllis is a beauty; and the name speaks for itself. I love how intricate the pink-colored veining is – it looks as though it had been painted on by an artist – and it perfectly complements the snow-white petals. The light ruffled edges and double blooms are a delight!”
Shantelle

Berger Pruning Saw
Berger Pruning Saw

Berger Pruning Saw
“This saw is great. It’s easy-open, easy-close and fits nicely in a side pocket or tool apron. I used it last spring to prune back my old and very large Butterfly Bush. It cut through 4″ diameter limbs in less than 1 minute, and cut through 1.5″ diameter branches in just 10 strokes.”
Mary V

Beech Tree at White Flower Farm

Winter Protection

As this is written in early November, it’s still too early to apply winter protection to newly-planted perennials, but it’s not too early to plan for it, if you garden in a cold-winter area (USDA Zone 6 [-10°F] or colder).

Although you might think a winter mulch keeps plants warm, it’s intended to do the opposite—to keep the ground frozen, instead of repeatedly thawing and refreezing. That freeze-thaw seesaw can heave lightly-rooted plants right out of the ground, leaving their roots vulnerable to freezing or drying out fatally. Perennials planted or transplanted in the fall are especially susceptible during their first winter.

Applying Mulch
Applying Mulch

To protect plants from heaving during their first winter, put a 4-6in layer of loose organic material such as straw, Oak leaves, pine needles, or evergreen boughs (cut into 1-2ft lengths) over the crowns after the ground freezes (generally in December here in Litchfield, Connecticut). Fortunately, after Dec. 25, there is a ready supply of Christmas trees to cut up for this purpose. Do not use bark mulch or other types of leaves, because these materials mat down and hold too much moisture over the crowns. Take care to avoid covering the evergreen foliage of plants such as Digitalis (Foxgloves) and Dianthus. Remove this winter cover gradually in spring when frosts become infrequent, usually at about the time Daffodils and Forsythias are in bloom.For these colder zones, we also recommend that you protect bulbs planted less than six inches deep. Again, after the ground freezes, apply a 4-6in covering of the same loose organic material over the bulbs. Because many of these smaller bulbs tend to bloom in very early spring, begin to remove the cover gradually in late winter or early spring—a bit earlier than you might for perennials.

Winter Protection
Winter Protection
Tulip 'Dream Touch'

Fall Sale! Save 20% on All Fall Planted Bulbs, Perennials & Shrubs

An extended period of mild autumn temperatures is a boon to gardeners. The soil in most parts of the country is still plenty warm, which creates ideal conditions for settling in new plants and bulbs. The comfortable weather also means it’s a fabulous time to be outdoors in the garden getting a head start on spring. To help you make some additions to your garden (and so you can help us clear out our greenhouses and the warehouse), we’re offering 20% off all fall planted bulbs and garden plants. Quantities are limited, so please order promptly. This offer ends Sunday, Nov. 12, 2017, at 11:59 p.m. Please use Coupon Code FALL20 when checking out online to activate the savings, or mention this code if you call to place your order. Discount prices will be reflected in the shopping cart during checkout. Please note, gift certificates are excluded from this sale. Click here to shop all fall plants on sale.

Tulip 'Analita'
Tulip ‘Analita’
Daffodil 'Winter Waltz'
Daffodil ‘Winter Waltz’
Papaver orientale Helen Elizabeth
Papaver orientale Helen Elizabeth

 

 

Lavender

Bring The Garden Indoors with Fragrant Houseplants

Almost everyone has experienced a moment when a certain scent – a freshly baked apple pie or the perfume worn by a favorite aunt – revives a memory and transports us to another place and time. The unique fragrances of many plants remain in our memory for a lifetime too.

Gardenia
Gardenia

Gardenias were very popular during the World War II era. A sweetly scented Gardenia corsage was considered the ultimate romantic gift and as a result, many war veterans still order the plants for their wives. Those vintage corsages may be passé now, but the Gardenia’s perfume and full-petaled white blooms are welcome outdoors in warmer climate gardens, and inside during the winter months.

Lavender 'Goodwin Creek Grey'
Lavender ‘Goodwin Creek Grey’

For centuries, the evocative scent of Lavender has been used to perfume the home, refresh the body, and rejuvenate the spirit. The herb is still a popular indoor favorite today – few people can resist touching the leaves or blossoms to release their soothing aroma. The flowers are easily dried for use in potpourri or sachets, preserving the scent for months.

Paperwhites
Paperwhites

The heady scent of Paperwhites can rekindle a variety of childhood memories. For many growing these bulbs in nothing more than water and stones was their first successful gardening project. In 2017, they remain a popular choice for forcing indoors as decoration and gifts – particularly during the holiday season. Gardeners of all ages still find them extremely easy to care for and fun to watch grow.

The Works Daffodil Mix

Bulb Planting Time is Here

Most plant growth is obvious, even to the casual observer. In spring and summer, we can see shoots, leaves, and stems burgeoning. By this time of year, that growth appears to slow, even stop. But another cycle of growth is just beginning in preparation for winter. Tucked safely – and invisibly – beneath the soil, bulbs are growing fresh new roots.

Out of sight usually means out of mind. However, you can improve the performance of your bulbs if you take a few moments to fertilize in the fall, even though it feels as though nothing new is happening in the plant world. The ideal bulb fertilizer is slow-release, lower in nitrogen (which supports leaf growth) and higher in phosphorous and potassium (to enhance roots and flowers). For centuries, bone meal was the bulb fertilizer of choice, but it’s not a complete fertilizer and may have the unfortunate consequence of attracting dogs or rodents, who digs around to try to find the tasty “bone,” so we no longer recommend it.

Apply the fertilizer as a top-dressing to your existing bulbs, or after planting new ones. You can do this now, or later in the season after you’ve cleared away spent plants.

With fertilizers, it’s important to follow label directions and apply only as much as directed. Applying more than your plants can absorb doesn’t benefit the plants, and excess nutrients can wash off into waterways, disrupting aquatic life. The best practice is to apply fertilizer with a frugal hand.

Oriental Lilium Mix - The Perfumed Garde

Your Guide to Choosing and Planting Lilies

Lilies grow form bulbs that are easy to plant and offer big rewards for your garden. Lilies add height, distinctive flower shapes, and sometimes perfume, to summer gardens. The season begins with the colorful Asiatic varieties, continues with the delightfully fragrant Orientals, and then the hybrid Orienpets, which combines the best traits of Oriental Lilies and statuesque Trumpet Lilies. To enjoy a long season of blooms, we recommend including some of each type.

Lilium Commander In Chief
Lilium Commander In Chief

Lilies produce their intriguing turk’s-cap or trumpet-shaped flowers on stems that can be graceful and arching, or sturdily upright and an inch thick. Plant heights range from 2 to 6ft or so, depending on the variety. All are elegant in perennial borders, and shorter varieties may be successfully grown in pots. Many Lilies look lovely naturalizing in sweeps, and we offer several mixes ideal for this purpose.

Plant Lilies in a cutting garden or in part of your vegetable garden so you can enjoy magnificent bouquets. A single stem in a vase makes a classic statement and Lilies also lend drama to mixed arrangements. Remove the stamens to avoid contact with the pollen (which can cause stubborn stains) and to prolong the life of the bloom.

 Lilium Arabesque

Lilium Arabesque

Thanks to modern storage facilities, most Lily bulbs are available to plant both in the spring and in the fall. Many Lilies prefer full sun but will flower in partial shade, which may help blooms to retain their color. Some of the species Lilies and their kin prefer afternoon shade, and require it in the hottest climates.

Plant Lilies in well-drained fertilize soil; they will not survive in soils that are poorly drained, especially in winter. Use a layer of mulch to keep their roots cool in summer. Feed plants with a balanced fertilizer in early spring and then again just before they start blooming. Ensure that plants receive regular moisture, especially during drought.

Pastel Shades Asiatic Lily Mix for Naturalizing
Pastel Shades Asiatic Lily Mix for Naturalizing

When all the flowers have passed, cut the stem directly below the blooms, so that as much foliage as possible is left to feed the bulb. Also, when cutting flowers for the house, keep the stems as short as possible for the same reason. Deadheading also makes the plants look neater and shortens the tall stems, so they are less likely to topple in a windstorm. After foliage dies back, cut stems off at ground level, or leave a few inches so you know where the bulbs are if you plan to do fall or spring planting around them.

Annuals Collection

Choose Your Favorite Annual Container Combinations

Dear Gardening Friends,

Every year at the farm, we create new and different combinations of annuals. We pot them up in spring and let them grow. At the end of the season, we select our favorites and offer them to you in our Spring Garden Book and on our website. This year, we thought we’d ask for your help in the selection process. Please click the link below to rate the annual collections you see based on a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being your favorite. Thanks for your help!

TAKE OUR SURVEY

 

White Flower Farm Classic Perennial Tulip Mixture

Plant Perennial Tulips Now and Enjoy A Glorious Spring For Years

The best way to encourage long life from your Tulip bulbs is to plant them deep. Try for a depth of 8-10 inches for full-size Tulips. That’s far deeper than any of those coring-type bulb planters will ever reach. The hand-corers also encourage repetitive motion problems if you’re planting more than half a dozen bulbs. So arm yourself with something heftier. We love our specialized bulb planters, for prepared soil or for naturalizing. The foot-powered tools dig deeper, and with far less effort, than a hand-powered one.

Tulip 'Blushing Girl'
Tulip ‘Blushing Girl’

The fastest way to plant bulbs involves two gardeners: one to dig, one to plant. To plant each bulb, create a deep slot by inserting the planting tool into the ground and pushing forward. Your assistant follows and pushes the bulb into the slot, then steps on the loose soil to push it back into place.

Tulip 'Dordogne'
Tulip ‘Dordogne’

The second tip: water when you’re finished planting. This helps settle the soil, and the moisture will trigger root growth, although it’s not obvious above ground, bulbs send out roots at this time of year, so they will be ready to burst into bloom when spring arrives.

It’s also a great idea to scatter some bulb fertilizer after you plant. We suggest a formula low in nitrogen and high in potassium for the best results.

Tulip 'Jaap Groot'
Tulip ‘Jaap Groot’

Squirrels have an uncanny ability to discover a spot where someone has very recently buried a tasty little bulb. Deep planting discourages squirrels, who rarely scratch down more than a few inches. But they might find Crocuses, since they are planted just three to five inches deep. If squirrels are a serious issue, we recommend laying a piece of hardware cloth or small-gauge poultry wire fencing over a newly planted area. You can take if off in a couple of weeks, after rain and watering has settled the soil and removed all telltale signs of planting.

Spring Calvary Collection`

Plant Exclusive Daffodil Mixes for Spectacular Spring Displays

Daffodils are usually the first flowers to make a significant statement in spring gardens. Since there are so many kinds that appear at different times, Daffodils can also be found blooming well into late spring. Daffodil mixes for naturalizing provide a long season of blossoms because they include many different types of Narcissus. As they naturalize, they will increase in number over the years. These mixes are ideal for woodlands and rock gardens, and in bedding areas.

Professional's Naturalizing Daffodil Mix
Professional’s Naturalizing Daffodil Mix

When planting Daffodils, make sure they have adequate drainage and plenty of sun, although some varieties will tolerate half-day shade. To encourage consistent Daffodil blooms, use a granular, slow-release fertilizer upon planting and then feed established bulbs in the fall. Using the right bulb planting tools will make the job a breeze. Watering during the fall is essential for good root growth before the ground freezes in cold regions. For helpful tips on planting Daffodils to create a naturalized look, please watch our video.

The Works Daffodil Mix
The Works Daffodil Mix

You can also take advantage of a wide range of Daffodils by designing areas that showcase specific colors or varieties. Be sure to plant fragrant Daffodils close to your house or anywhere their perfume will be readily appreciated.

First Blush Pink Narcissus Mixture
First Blush Pink Narcissus Mixture

Daffodils can be enjoyed equally indoors in forced bulb gardens. Set in a sunny window in a cool room, they yield a delightful tapestry of bloom during the long winter months.

Early Cheer Bulb Collection
Early Cheer Bulb Collection
native-plant-garden-20170806-133

Reviewing Summer’s Highlights

At this time of year, as the days grow perceptibly shorter and the nights are beginning to cool, we enjoy sitting outdoors in the evening, sipping a glass of iced tea (or something stiffer) as the sun goes down, and reviewing some of the season’s highlights.

A Bumper Crop of Blueberries

One of the great joys of the 2017 garden season was a bumper crop of Blueberries. For weeks this summer, we feasted on handfuls of our own fresh-picked fruit, harvesting enough from our array of bushes to make pies and cobblers, and to top our cereal. Who or what gets the credit for the above-average yields? Blueberry bushes thrive in acid soil that is moisture-retentive yet well-drained. Mother Nature did her part by providing plenty of rain, a welcome relief from two previous seasons of drought, which afflicted our region and many other parts of the country. We did our part by boosting the acid level of the soil. We compost our coffee grounds at the feet of our Blueberry bushes. A dose of high acid fertilizer administered twice a year, once in spring and again in early fall, also doesn’t hurt.

Blueberry Earliblue
Blueberry Earliblue

Another factor in this season’s bonanza may have been this year’s temperatures, which were cool in early spring and relatively moderate in summer. Our Nursery Manager Barb Pierson points out that Blueberry flowers stay open longer when temperatures are mild. The longer they remain open, the more time pollinators have to make their rounds. In extreme heat, the flowers wilt, and pollination is thwarted.

Blueberry Blueray
Blueberry Blueray

To enjoy the longest period of harvest possible in any season, we recommend planting several different varieties of Blueberry bushes and choosing plants that fruit at various times. In our gardens, we grow the aptly named ‘Earliblue’ for the season’s first crop, followed by midseason ‘Blueray’ and late fruiting ‘Elliott.’

Blueberry Elliott
Blueberry Elliott

The season’s bumper Blueberry crop notwithstanding, these shrubs are too often overlooked for their ornamental value, something that becomes especially apparent at this time of year when the green foliage changes to shades of burgundy orange. They make a beautiful sight in the autumn light.

The Native Garden Takes Off

It’s often said that native plants have what might be called a hometown advantage – growing better and requiring less support than plants that hail from faraway places. The plants in our new native garden at the farm certainly support the theory. While it must be taken into account that gardeners in our region had a generally fine year thanks to ample rain and milder-than-usual summer temperatures, it’s hard to argue with the stellar performance we’re seeing among the natives. The garden was designed by our head gardener, Cheryl Whalen, and planted out this spring. For inclusion, Cheryl chose a mix of species plants (“species” may be regarded as the original form of any native) and some improved hybrids (plants that have been bred to improve or enhance particular characteristics of the species). In the case of some varieties, Cheryl chose to plant both the species and an improved version or two, which affords us and our visitors the benefit of comparing their differences. The starter plants and bareroot specimens were planted in the garden in May. By July and August, the majority had taken off and filled in beautifully.

Our enthusiasm for natives has led us to add more to our offerings over the last few seasons. Plant some in your garden and see if you don’t experience similar results. You’ll find an array of plants native to the Northeast here on our website.

Native Wildflowers
Native Wildflowers

To find plants native to other areas, visit the Aububon Native Plants Data Base. Enter your zip code and a detailed list of plants will appear.

Here Come the Sweet Peas

The exquisite colors and sweet fragrance of Sweet Peas have made them a longtime favorite of floral designers. But because these plants adhere to a somewhat tricky timetable and require a bit of special care as they grow, they are rarely (if ever) found in garden centers or nurseries. Sweet Peas are started from seeds in late winter, and this can be a defeating proposition for anyone in a cool climate who lacks a heated greenhouse or indoor seed-starting capabilities. Sweet Peas are vining plants, and they tend to tangle as they grow, making them difficult to display on the crowded shelves in most stores.

Sweet Pea
Sweet Pea

Because we love these annuals, and because the demand for them has grown in recent years, we undertook a trial this summer to see if we could ship Sweet Pea plants (not seeds) to our customers. We began by ordering Sweet Pea seeds in a range of pleasing colors. (This is easy work given the range of captivating colors and bicolors available.) We propagated the seeds in our greenhouses, and in early May, just prior to what turned out to be the season’s last frost, we transplanted some of the seedlings into our gardens at the farm. (Sweet Peas can take a bit of cold, and they came through the frost just fine. What they can’t tolerate is high heat.) Other Sweet Pea seedlings were shipped to our homes to ensure that our packaging held the plants securely and that the plants themselves would come through their few days in dark boxes in the back of unheated trucks.

Sweet Pea
Sweet Pea

The happy ending to this story is that all of the Sweet Peas we trialed exceeded our expectations. Our gardens were filled with these lovely blooms, many of them sweetly scented, for weeks in June and July, which is roughly when the plants subside. As of this writing, our horticulture staff is selecting the varieties of Sweet Pea plants we’ll be offering to you in next spring’s Garden Book. Our publications team is putting together the information you’ll need to grow these plants, which require the support of a trellis, fence, tuteur or bamboo stake, along with techniques for encouraging the maximum number of blooms and the long, straight stems that are prized for cutting.

For a preview of some of these techniques and to learn more about Sweet Peas, visit the superb blog post on the topic by our friend Matt Mattus, the author behind Growing With Plants. You’ll find it here.

Lavender Phenomenal™ – True to Its Name

 

Lavender Phenomenal
Lavender Phenomenal

Several seasons ago, we planted a low hedge of Lavender Phenomenal™, a plant that was billed as an exceptionally hardy variety that could take heat, humidity and cold temperatures better than many of its cousins. We were skeptical, as we are when a claim sounds too good to be true, but we also took note of the fact that Lavender Phenomenal™ is used in municipal plantings in Europe due to its vigorous nature. We undertook to test the plant’s hardiness. On the crest of a hill at the farm, in a sunny meadow beside our pool, we planted a low hedge of Lavender Phenomenal™ around the perimeter of the pool enclosure. In the first two years, the plants settled in well. They sailed through two seasons of drought. They came through cold winters with nary a plant lost. Deer meandered by, ignoring the plants completely. This season, which brought more rain than we’ve had in years, a moisture level that can be the bane of Lavender, the plants performed equally well, growing, blooming, thriving, their silver foliage creating a lovely contrast with the green grass around and providing a beautiful definition for the fenced perimeter of the pool. The fragrance of the Lavender carries, and the bees feast on the flowers, adding a joyful buzz to the air. Each time we walk across the field and spy our hedge, we have the sudden sense that we’ve arrived in the south of France. How lovely to feel this sensation in our own back yard.

Fragrant Hosta

Hosta Cathedral Windows
Hosta Cathedral Windows

Hosta plants are justifiably celebrated for their robust dispositions and variety of sizes and colors. They are an essential, indispensable component for every shade garden. But a few varieties of Hosta have even more to offer. These are the scented kinds that are relatives of Hosta plantaginea. Their blossoms emit a delicate fragrance that is sweet and light, but never cloying. In the dog days of summer, it’s a wonder to sniff at the blooms of these fragrant blooms, which provide such unexpected and pleasing perfume. Bees love the flowers, too, and they sometimes can be found inside the blossoms, so check the blooms for visitors before putting your nose too close.

Hosta Cathedral Windows
Hosta Cathedral Windows

We thought it high time these shade garden treasures were given their due, and next spring, we hope you’ll find room in the garden for our Fragrant Hosta Collection. Next summer, when the blossoms appear, you’ll be so glad you did.

 

Our New Line of Indoor Plants

Ruby Rubber Plant
Ruby Rubber Plant

In our fall catalog, we were pleased to introduce a new line of magnificent houseplants. These are beautiful specimens, the majority foliage plants, that we carefully selected for their vigor, perpetual good looks, and ease of care. We’re offering them in a range of sizes and styles from tabletop Aloes and Ferns to statuesque Palms and Philodendrons. These plants were an enormous hit at our annual Tent Sale (the table of them was cleared in about the first 15 minutes), and they’re selling briskly via our catalog and website. I mention them again in this writing because our customer service team has been fielding one common question among prospective buyers of these plants. It goes something like this: “Your indoor plants look large in catalog and website photographs, just how big are they?” We’re pleased to report that the scale of the houseplants you see in our photographs roughly matches the size of the plants we send to you (with a bit of give and take allowed for the variations that occur among natural, living plants). Our shipping staff spent a considerable amount of time devising the correct packaging for each new variety – especially the largest – to ensure that our plants arrive at your door looking just the way they did when they left our greenhouses.

Lady Palm
Lady Palm

It’s important to note that while all of these houseplants are low-maintenance additions to any home or office, their lighting and watering requirements will differ depending on type. It’s important to familiarize yourself with the needs of your particular plant, the cardinal sin for most being overwatering. Complete information for caring for each houseplant is included in all shipments. You’ll also find it on our website, on the product page for each plant, under Growing Guide.

As we all begin moving our plants indoors for the autumn and winter, we encourage you to add living greenery to your interiors. Plants add color and vitality, and we can’t be alone in thinking they make life better.