Rose Carding Mill™
Rose Carding Mill™

Rose Carding Mill™

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SKU: S66936
1 for $33.95
9 Reviews
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Quick Facts
Common Name: English Rose (David Austin)
Hardiness Zone: 5-9S/W Exposure: Sun
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Blooms In: Jun-Sep
Height: 4-6' Spacing: 3-5'
Read our Growing Guide Ships as: BAREROOT
Fragrance: Yes
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Product Details

Product Details

Antique beauty matched with a modern repeat-flowering habit are the keynotes of hybridizer David Austin's Roses, and Carding Mill® is an outstanding example of his achievement. Full, slightly nodding blossoms with about 80 petals appear apricot but combine shades of pink and yellow and are deep apricot inside when they first open. Their rich myrrh perfume and the leaves disease resistance are also welcome. Own-root. 'Auswest'

British rosarian David Austin has bred these exceptional varieties to combine the flower forms and fragrances of Old Roses with the repeat-blooming trait of modern strains. Gardenworthy in every respect, they contribute mightily to perennial beds and shrub borders. They also make excellent cut flowers.

Roses offer colors, perfumes, forms, and habits to suit every garden situation. The tenacious efforts of breeders have yielded Roses with the best attributes of different varieties in new forms. Hybrid Teas, lovely as ever, now combine long bloom periods with the vigor to shrug off pests. Shrub Roses bloom for months, rather than weeks, in addition to their ever-appealing hardiness and longevity. A new group is so exceptionally long-blooming and carefree that they are simply called "Landscape Roses." In short, these are not your grandmothers, or even your mothers, finicky Roses. Simply choose according to your circumstances. Roses require six or more hours of direct sun per day and a fertile, reasonably moist soil.

Tip: We use Organic Gem® as a foliar feed on Rose bushes in our trial garden and find plants are healthier and perform better throughout the season.

Shipping

Shipping

HOW PLANTS ARE SHIPPED

The size of the plants we ship has been selected to reduce the shock of transplanting. For some, this means a large, bareroot crown. Others cannot travel bareroot or transplant best if grown in containers. We ship these perennials and annuals in 1 pint pots, except as noted. We must point out that many perennials will not bloom the first year after planting, but will the following year, amply rewarding your patience. We ship bulbs as dormant, bare bulbs, sometimes with some wood shavings or moss. Shrubs, Roses, vines, and other woody plants may be shipped bareroot or in pots. The size of the pot is noted in the quick facts for each item.

WHEN WE SHIP

We ship our bulbs and plants at the right time for planting in your area, except as noted, with orders dispatched on a first-come, first-served basis by climate zone. Estimated dates for shipping are indicated in the Shipping Details box for each item. Please refer to the Shipping Details box to determine the earliest shipping time. Unless you specify otherwise, fertilizers, tools, and other non-plant items are shipped with your plants or bulbs. Please supply a street address for delivery. Kindly contact us with two weeks notice, if you'll be away at expected time of delivery.

OUR GUARANTEE

We guarantee to ship plants that are in prime condition for growing. If your order is damaged or fails to meet your expectations, we will cheerfully replace or refund it. Please contact our Customer Service Department at 1-800-503-9624 or email us at [email protected]. Please include your order number or customer number when contacting us.

Reviews

Reviews

Average Customer Rating: (9 Reviews) Write a Review

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very pretty rose

A viewer from denver, co

I've had good luck with this rose, although (full disclosure) I didn't purchase it from White Flower Farm--it bloomed profusely the first year after planting, and second year seems to be shaping up similarly. I planted it in a location with full western afternoon sun, a few feet from the brick wall of my house, with some trepidation, but it seems quite happy. Two Denver winters, although the last was quite mild for here. So far, I would describe it as hardy. The flowers are a lovely apricot, fading a little more to the yellow as they age.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful. Do you? yes no


not vigorous in my garden, but my most beautiful rose

Nancy in Ohio from Oxford, Ohio

This is by far my favorite rose- the blooms are a glorious shade of peach/apricot (the color of Austin's Juliet wedding roses, but with a different flower form). I bought three last year and will add two more this year. However, in their first year they were poor growers- few canes, only a few flowers and a whole lot of black spot. I am now on a mission to find a rose of the same color that will be healthier, more vigorous in growth, and more free flowering. I'm trying "At Last" from White Flower Farm, as well as Austin roses The Shepherdess and William Morris from another source.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful. Do you? yes no


bounced back from poor care

goldie from exmore, va

I bought this rose 2 years ago and planted it in a part of my yard that watering didn't reach. It grew slowly the first year, then I decided to transplant it. The shovel slipped and I cut off almost all of the root system. I transplanted what was left and gave it plenty of water. I was amazed at how well it bounced back! It is now a beautiful showpiece by the front porch. All the care I give it is a drink, some compost, and a little pruning.

8 of 8 people found this review helpful. Do you? yes no


Beautiful pale peach

Chaud Rosin from Tupelo, MS

This rose is a beautiful peach color. Hardy and dependable. My rose is about 2-3 years old and not terribly tall.

7 of 8 people found this review helpful. Do you? yes no  Certified buyer


Great in pictures, but in real life.....

Nannie Greenthumb from Seminole, Florida

White Flower Farm is a tradition of over 50 years in our family and normally every plant, flower, rose, shrub purchased has been a winner. Not so with this David Austin Rose. Perhaps due to the travel time from the UK (if that is where they are shipped from) or perhaps I got a less than healthy bare root plant, this rose has been a disappointment from the beginning. Very scraggly canes even with appropriate fertilizer and pruning, maybe one rose or two a year. I will not buy this again, but it does look lovely in pictures.

9 of 9 people found this review helpful. Do you? yes no  Certified buyer

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Growing guide

Growing guide
Print Grow Guide

Today's Roses are easier to grow than you might expect.

  • The basic needs for Roses include plenty of direct sun and fertile, well-drained soil.
  • Roses tolerate a range of soil types (from sand to clay), as long as a little care is taken to prepare the soil at planting time.

We offer both own-root and grafted Roses.

  • Own-root Roses are plants grown from cuttings. They have their own root systems and remain true to the original varieties.
  • Grafted Roses are plants that have vigorous rootstocks fused to the top parts of other Roses that are valued for their flowers.

Planting Bareroot Roses: 

  • Before planting a bareroot Rose, remove and discard the packing material and soak the roots for a few hours.
  • Dig a planting hole that allows sufficient room for the depth and spread of the roots.
  • Add organic matter—such as compost or aged manure—and mix this into the soil dug from the hole.
  • Set the plant in the hole so that the top of the graft, or the crown of own-root Roses (the point where the stems of the plant meet the roots), is 3" below soil level in the North, and at the same level or 1" above where winters are mild.

  • Push the mix of soil and organic matter back into the hole, tamping firmly as you go. Water thoroughly.
  • Add a generous layer of organic mulch (compost or aged manure is best) to help keep the soil evenly moist.
  • Water thoroughly once every 2 weeks if rainfall is scarce throughout the growing season and into fall.

Planting Potted Roses:

  • Check the moisture of the potting mix in the container and, if dry, water thoroughly.
  • Dig a hole wide enough and just deep enough for the root ball.
  • Add organic matter—such as compost or aged manure—and mix this into the soil dug from the hole.
  • Remove the plant from the container and gently break up the sides of the root ball with your thumbs and carefully untangle any roots circling at the bottom.
  • Set the root ball in the hole so that the top of the root ball is level with the surface of the surrounding soil.

  • Push the mix of soil and organic matter back into the hole, tamping firmly as you go. Water thoroughly.
  • Add a generous layer of organic mulch (compost or aged manure is best) to help keep the soil evenly moist.
  • Water thoroughly once a week if rainfall is scarce during the growing season and throughout fall.

Light: Roses grow best where they receive at least 6 hours of direct sun per day.

Watering: We recommend watering in the morning if possible so that the foliage doesn’t remain wet into the evening. If the weather is dry, water thoroughly every 2 weeks.

Fertilizer: Roses grow more vigorously, bloom more prolifically, and show greater resistance to diseases if fertilized during the growing season.

  • For best results, add a layer of compost or aged manure in early spring around the base of the plant. After the first wave of bloom, apply a bloom-boosting fertilizer (15-30-15).
  • For organic gardeners, we recommend adding a layer of compost or aged manure in early spring and applying an organic fertilizer after the first wave of bloom.

Pests & Diseases: The Roses we offer are selected for their vigor and their resistance to pests and diseases. 

  • Some Roses are prone to fungus problems (such as black spot) in hot, humid areas. Cleaning up old foliage from the base of the plant is important for disease control.
  • We recommend the use of environmentally-friendly horticultural oil and insect sprays listed by the Organic Materials Review Institute (OMRI).
  • Japanese beetles may be handpicked or a systemic pesticide may be used. In spring, check for Rose slugs (sawfly larvae that appear as tiny, green caterpillars and skeletonize Rose foliage) and physically destroy them or spray with superfine horticultural oil.

Pruning: Prune Roses to remove deadwood, to control or direct growth, and to promote flowering.

  • Wait until growth breaks from the canes in early to mid-spring before pruning.
  • To train climbers in early spring, trim thinner side shoots from the base of the main branches. Attach new stems to their supports throughout the growing season.
  • If the Rose bush has become too tall, the stems may be cut back by one-third to one-half in early spring or after the first wave of blooms.
  • With the exception of the rugosas, which produce attractive hips (fruits), remove the spent flowers of reblooming Roses to promote more bloom.

Transplanting: Roses may be moved in early spring when dormant.

End-of-Season Care: In our experience, the best way to get Roses through winter is to choose plants adapted to your climate zone.

  • Mound 2 shovelfuls of bark mulch around the base of the plant before the start of winter. This added layer of protection is especially important for grafted Roses.

 

Videos

Videos
How to Grow Roses
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