Native Plant Garden

It’s June: What Can Be Done in the Garden?

It’s June in the garden. What are some of the things you could be doing?

For starters, with spring’s unsettled weather finally yielding to the more predictable warmth of summer, it’s time to consider giving your houseplants a summer vacation outdoors. Make sure to provide all houseplants with a sheltered, lightly shaded spot when you first bring them outside to protect them from sun and wind. Depending on the plants, some may require full shade all summer, while others will enjoy a real sunbath. Since most of your plants will be growing more strongly in summer, be sure to keep up with fertilizing as well as watering.

Amaryllis Alasca®
Amaryllis Alasca®

Amaryllis that blossomed for you in winter can be summered over outdoors, a ritual that rebuilds the bulb for another season of winter bloom. Plants will benefit from the stronger sunlight in the garden and are happy in a full sun location after a gradual introduction. Their strappy foliage is feeding the bulb for next winter’s performance. You can knock the bulbs out of their pots and plant them in a bed, or leave them as they are in their pots. If leaves turn yellow, cut them off at the base. We keep our Amaryllis outside until light frost blackens the foliage in autumn, then we store them in a cool (55 degrees F), dark place such as a basement for a period of 8-10 weeks. For more information on caring for these exotic bulbs, see our Amaryllis Growing Guide.

What else should you be doing in the garden?

  • Prune Lilacs now, removing spent blooms.
  • Tomatoes in Sausalito Self-Watering Container with Tomato Support
  • Tomatoes will start growing rapidly. Keep plants secure to their stakes or supports by using ties, clips  or cotton rags. We like to pinch off suckers, the additional stems that appear in the axils between the leaves and the main stem. For more information on caring for Tomatoes, see our Growing Guide.
  • Nepeta 'Walkers Low'
    Nepeta ‘Walkers Low’
  • Mature Nepeta (Catmints) can get floppy after bloom. After the first flush of flowers, cut back the plants  to just a few inches tall. They recover quickly and are more likely to maintain a mounded shape following a serious haircut.
  • Remove spent Rhododendron flowers as soon as the blossoms subside. Be careful not to remove new buds at the base of old flower stems.
  • When Lettuce gets bitter and starts to bolt, pull out the plants, compost them, and use the space for Bush Beans or Summer Squash. A late planting of Squash often fools vine borers.
  • Keep up with weeding and watering.
  • Harvest Basil by cutting off branches and then removing the leaves. Pinch off flower buds to keep your plant producing stems and leaves. Water when the top 1″ of soil is dry. Feed monthly with a balanced fertilizer.

 

 

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