Category Archives: Garden Design

Front Door Decorating

Share the joy of the season with family, friends, and neighbors when you decorate your front door for the holidays. Using beautiful evergreen wreaths and garlands, you transform your front entrance into a beacon of holiday cheer. Annual planters also help create a festive look outside your home by making beautiful use of the decorations Mother Nature provides for the winter months. Take advantage of variously colored and textured evergreens, bright red winterberries, pine cones, seed pods, and colorful twigs. Scroll below for a bit of inspiration and to see some of the products we offer, and telegraph a little cheer around your neighborhood.

Holly and Greens Garland and Wreath

These handsome and traditional decorations hail from Oregon where members of a family-owned firm harvest holly from their own groves then combine it with the fresh-cut foliage of locally grown evergreens and Ponderosa pine cones. The sweet and tangy fragrance of these lush greens will fill a room with the classic, all-natural scent of Christmastime.

Huckleberry Crescent Ring

The rich, warm tones of Huckleberry add vibrant holiday color to this beautiful and inviting wreath. Arrayed on a gold-colored metal ring is a crescent of fresh Manzanita overlaid with red Huckleberry stems and finished with a burgundy satin bow.

Canella Berry Door Greeter

Welcome all who stop by your house with this eye-catching arrangement of holiday reds and greens. Freshly harvested, lush branches of fragrant Noble Fir, Incense Cedar, and berried Juniper are accented by clusters of red Canella berries and pine cones, then topped with a bright bow edged in gold.

Winter Containers

In the planting on the right, we feature live Chamaecyparis ‘Boulevard,’ paired with Dogwood stems and topped with frosted Pine Cones. The container on the left combines gold-rimmed Euonymus ‘Aureomarginatus’ and Chamaecyparis ‘Sungold’ complemented by berried Juniper stems. Both containers are brightened by Winterberry stems.

Touch of Gold Decorating Greens

For those who enjoy a DIY project, we offer boxes of freshly harvested greens that are ideal for filling outdoor containers and window boxes. Our Touch of Gold collections include gilded Nigella, Flax and Lotus pods to add sparkle to your decorations.

Growing Citrus Indoors

The benefits and delights of growing Citrus indoors are numerous. For starters, these small trees with glossy green leaves are lovely to look at. When in flower, the scent of their blossoms is pure heaven. Then, of course, there is fresh, homegrown fruit to enjoy. A few easy tips will help you succeed in maintaining a healthy and productive Citrus plant.

When you receive your plant, do not be alarmed if it begins to drop flowers, fruit, and/or foliage, as this is the plant’s reaction to being shipped. Citrus plants need at least 4–6 weeks to acclimate to a new location and this acclimation can take longer if the plant is receiving less than 6 hours of direct sun per day. During this time, DO NOT fertilize the plant, as this will cause further stress. Once the plant is acclimated—which means the plant is able to produce and maintain new growth—you can begin fertilizing according to our recommendations mentioned below.

The juice of Key Lime (Citrus aurantiifolia) gives a sparkling tang to pies as well as Mediterranean, Mexican, and Asian recipes. (It will also spruce up any drink from ice-cold water to something stiffer.)

In most of the United States, these plants must be grown indoors, at least during the winter. Fortunately, their rootstock will keep them a manageable size (to no more than 4–5′ in a container), so they can summer on the patio and spend the winter in a greenhouse, an enclosed porch, or near a sunny, south-facing window. Move the plant outdoors in late spring if you’d like, but wait until the weather is warm and settled.

Gardeners in Zone 10 and warmer can grow Calamondin Orange and ‘Meyer Improved’ Lemon outdoors. ‘Meyer Improved’ Lemon is hardy in Zone 9 as well. Set the pot outdoors in a sheltered, lightly shaded spot, increasing the exposure to sun and wind each day. Check the moisture of the potting mix and water thoroughly if it’s dry. At the end of one week (give or take a day or two), your plant will be ready to go in the ground. Choose a spot for your plant that receives full sun (at least 6 hours of direct sun each day) and is protected from drying winds. Planted in the ground, our Citrus will grow approximately 10′ tall.

‘Meyer Improved’ is a hybrid between a Lemon and an Orange, which makes it a little sweeter than regular Lemons. It’s also a prolific bearer. You’ll enjoy the heavenly scent from luscious blooms followed by fruit in midwinter.

Since Citrus plants are heavy feeders, we include a nutrient spray and a slow-release fertilizer with all varieties. For the nutrient spray: Once your plant has acclimated to its new home (about 4-6 weeks from receipt of plant) and when it is warm enough to spray your plant outdoors in your area, add all of the product to 4 oz of water in a spray bottle (not included). Move the plant to a shady location and spray the leaves. Avoid spraying the blooms. Apply weekly until gone. For the slow-release fertilizer: Once your plant has acclimated to its new home (about 4-6 weeks from receipt), uniformly spread complete package contents on the soil at the base of your plant. Do not mix with water or apply to foliage.

Prune Citrus at any time of the year except winter. Pinch growing tips and cut back leggy branches to help a spindly tree fill out. Suckers (shoots growing from below the graft or emerging from the soil) should be cut back as soon as they’re noticed.

To learn more, watch our short video “How to Grow Citrus Plants” below.

Learn About Hardiness Zones

If you’ve spent any time on our website, or read any of our catalogs, you’ve likely encountered the term “hardiness zone.” We’d like to de-mystify this term a bit, and explain how location should play into your selection of plants.

What Is a Hardiness Zone?

Using historical temperature data, the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) has divided the country into 13 hardiness zones, ranging from 1 (coldest) to 13 (warmest). Each of these zones is further divided into “A” and “B” for greater accuracy, with A being colder than B. Click here to see the USDA’s hardiness zone map. These zones are defined by average annual minimum temperatures. For example, a zip code in which the average annual minimum temperature is between -15 and -10 Fahrenheit is assigned to hardiness zone 5B.

The idea behind the map is that a gardener may look up his or her hardiness zone and use it to identify plants that will thrive in their area. For example, a gardener in Northwest Connecticut (hardiness zone 5) may confidently plant a variety that has been rated hardy to zone 4 but would generally not plant a variety that is rated hardy only to zone 6, because the zone 6 plant is not likely to survive the typical winter in that area.

How To Find & Use Your Hardiness Zone on WhiteFlowerFarm.com

First, go to www.whiteflowerfarm.com. At the top of our home page, just under the Search box, click on Find Your Hardiness Zone and enter your zip code in the box that appears, then click on Look Up. When the page reappears, your zone number will be listed at the top of the page (in the spot previously occupied by Find Your Hardiness Zone). As you navigate our site, use the filters on the left side of the page to narrow down a listing to display only plants that will thrive in your zone.

If you choose a plant or plants that are not considered hardy in your zone, our site will offer a gentle warning at checkout. This is not intended to dissuade you (in fact, plants can sometimes be “pushed” to grow outside their hardiness zones), but we wish to help you avoid any possible disappointment if a plant fails to perform well due to a climate mismatch. Please be aware that we cannot honor our usual guarantee on plants that have been shipped outside of their suggested hardiness range.

Sometimes Hardiness Ratings Include “S” or “W” – What Does This Mean?

When listing the hardiness range of a plant, we often “split” the warm end of the range—for example, you might see a plant listed as Hardiness Zone: 3-8S/10W. In this instance, the 3 refers to the “cold hardiness” of the plant—all else equal, this variety should overwinter successfully in zone 3. The 8S refers to the humid Southeast (the ‘S’ being for ‘South’) and the 10W (‘W’ for ‘West’) to the comparatively dry Pacific Coast states of CA, OR, and WA—this plant can tolerate zone 8 temperatures in the South, and zone 10 temperatures on the West coast. In Northern climates, summer heat is not typically a consideration.

So to summarize—a plant listed as 3-8S/10W should successfully overwinter in zones 3 or warmer, tolerate humid heat up to zone 8, and tolerate dry heat up to zone 10.

We realize this is complicated; the problem is that the USDA zones are really not sufficiently specific. For example, our nursery in Connecticut is in the same hardiness zone as Taos, NM—a climate that could hardly be more different than ours. Furthermore, there are innumerable other variables that may determine how a plant fares in a given site. We find that customers, over time, gain a good understanding of which plants do and don’t work for them, and that this understanding is much more helpful than a strict reliance on hardiness zone. When in doubt, please contact us—our customer service team is extremely knowledgeable and ready to assist.

Different Types of Amaryllis

We start the holiday season with over 70 Amaryllis varieties, including Singles, Doubles, Nymphs, Small-Flowered Varieties and Cybisters in a dazzling range of colors. Our Amaryllis bulbs are the top size commercially available (larger than what is generally seen at retail stores) and have been fully prepared at the proper temperature. Given warm temperatures, strong light, and water upon arrival, they will put on a spectacular show that will brighten up even the gloomiest winter day. Scroll below to see the wide range of varieties and colors available.

The 5″ double red blossoms of Amaryllis Fanfare® are very flared, very full, and very ruffled.

South African Amaryllis produce the same large, richly colored blooms as their Dutch cousins, but on an earlier timetable. Because bulbs grown in the Southern Hemisphere mature sooner in the year, we begin filling orders in October, and South African varieties will bloom about 6-8 weeks from receipt, often in time for the holidays.

Cybister Amaryllis produce delicate blooms that look more like wildflowers or dragonflies. These reliable growers will delight you with their colorful yet exotic flowers.

The blooms of Cybister Amaryllis (varieties of the South American species Hippeastrum cybister) look like exotic tropical birds but the bulbs are as floriferous and easy to grow as their bigger cousins. The dramatic Cybister Amaryllis naturally make smaller bulbs and flowers.

The vibrant coral flowers of ‘Sunshine Nymph’ are detailed with pink undertones and white stripes.

Nymphs are a distinctive, carefully-bred class of Amaryllis with exceptionally large and heavily petaled flowers on very strong stems. As the photos confirm, blooms are nearly as wide as the pots they grow in and each stem is guaranteed to produce four flowers, a rarity among doubles.

These red-and-white, lightly ruffled blooms of ‘Spotlight’ take center stage and light up even the darkest winter days with white lower petals that are etched with dark orange flecks and soft brushstrokes.

Amaryllis flowers come in a variety of colors, or even shades of colors. These types are known as bicolor Amaryllis. Bicolor means the Amaryllis flower has two colors on the same bloom.

As iconic as its Hollywood namesake, ‘Marilyn,’ this perfectly proportioned beauty turns heads with voluptuous double white flowers and faint green undertones.

Double Amaryllis are popular for good reason. Their shapely blooms and rich colors light up a cold day like nothing else we know.

These enormous, open-faced, solid pink blossoms of ‘Lagoon’ cast a spell of tranquil beauty.

Amaryllis flowers come in a variety of shapes and sizes, including single-flowered varieties. This means they have a single layer of petals that form the flower.

To learn more about Amaryllis, watch our short video below, ‘How to Pot and Care for Amarylls.’

 

Climbers in the Garden

Elevate your garden design by incorporating climbing vines and plants into beds and borders, or by using them to soften fences, walls and wellheads. Smaller climbers, including some Clematis varieties, can be used to add vertical interest to container pots or to skirt the trunks of deciduous trees. We offer all of these plants for fall-planting because autumn’s mild weather gives them a chance to settle in under stress-free conditions. They develop root systems before going dormant for winter. When spring comes, they’re poised to begin growing above ground, and they have a nice head start on vines and climbers planted in spring.

Clematis Rosemoor™ Gardini™

When you hang the name of a Royal Horticultural Society garden on a new introduction, it had better be good. Clematis Rosemoor™ Gardini™ is better than good. It comes from Raymond Evison’s superb breeding program on the Isle of Guernsey. Its showy 5″ purplish-red blooms appear on old and new wood, which means flowering is almost nonstop from early summer to fall.

Dawn & Dusk Rose & Clematis Collection

Stunning aerial liaisons can be arranged by pairing two different vines or climbers. We especially like deep purple Clematis ‘Etoile Violette’ with the blush pink, double-flowered Climbing Rose ‘New Dawn.’ The Clematis clambers up the Rose’s thorny canes and obligingly places its flowers next to those of its host. When the two are at their peak in early July, the display is pure magic, and both generally offer some repeat bloom through summer. ‘New Dawn’ is sweetly fragrant and disease-resistant, especially to black spot, the bane of many Roses.

Clematis Petit Faucon™ Gardini™

Unusual blossoms made up of 4 slender, twisting petals in vivid purple blue with contrasting yellow anthers appear over a long season on this compact, non-clinging vine. At a mature height of 3-4’, it’s ideal for containers, or for climbing over shrubs. Winner of the RHS Award of Garden Merit.

Climbing Hydrangea

Hydrangea is a valuable genus of some 100 species of shrubs and vines grown for their large and very showy flower heads. Hydrangea anomala petiolaris, or Climbing Hydrangea as it’s more commonly called, is a vigorous deciduous vine from Japan and Korea whose heart-shaped foliage and large white clusters of June flowers make it an attractive covering for a wall, fence, or large tree.

Rose ‘William Baffin’

Climbing Rose ‘William Baffin’ has yet to receive the attention it deserves. It bears semidouble, deep pink flowers in abundance in late June, with recurrent bloom well into fall. It is also exceptionally vigorous and hardy, the only recurrent climber available to gardeners in Zones 3 and 4. It’s destined to become one of the most enduring Roses of our era.

Wisteria Lavender Falls

Wisteria is a genus of deciduous vines whose lovely, fragrant flowers and almost overwhelming vigor make them useful in a wide variety of settings. Wisteria Lavender Falls, originally grown in Oklahoma, is an outstanding variety that has blue-violet, 9–20″ cascading racemes that have the scent of grape jelly. The really exciting part is that they reappear several times during the summer.

Decorate for Fall with Our New Container Collections

With the first few nights of cool, crisp air arriving at last, it’s clear that autumn is on the way. As we begin preparing our gardens for winter, doing yard work and cleanup, it’s also a great time to refresh patio and front porch planters. The fall season comes alive when using colorful combinations to provide an extended display of vibrant blooms and richly textured foliage that will last right up until frost. Spruce up your outdoor spaces for fall festivities and harvest-time holidays including Halloween and Thanksgiving. Pictured below are our new fall container plantings. You may order any of them through our website, or use them as inspiration to create your own fall container plantings.

Indian Summer Shrub and Perennial Collection

Spikes of Ornamental Grass ‘Standing Ovation’ introduce a red tone that’s repeated in the foliage of Heucheras ‘Forever Purple’ and ‘Peach Flambe.’ Adding a sprinkle of gold are the yellow-and-green leaves of Euonymus ‘Aureomarginatus’ and the feathery evergreen foliage of False Cypress ‘Sungold.’

Fall Fireworks Collection

Purple Fountain Grass sends up a burst of burgundy foliage followed by a spray of flower spikes in late summer and autumn. It creates a breezy canopy over the single daisies of an Aster and the bronzy purple foliage of an Ajuga.

Autumn Brocade Shrub and Perennial Collection

Anchored by evergreen Arborvitae ‘American Pillar,’ our handsome autumn collection features rich, beautifully textured shades of burgundy Heuchera, blue Juniper, variegated gold-and-green Boxwood, and rosy red Calluna.

Standing Ovation Fall Container Garden

The blue-green flower spikes of an Ornamental Grass stand tall just in time for an autumn show. Supporting the display are the silvery felted leaves of a Stachys, the frosted maroon leaves of a Heuchera, and the white flower spikes of a Calluna.

Autumn Glow Shrub and Perennial Collection

Set the stage for fall with our easy-care combination of 3 harmonious companions. Sure to draw the eye is False Cypress ‘Boulevard,’ with striking blue foliage that serves as a colorful backdrop for the richly hued leaves of Heuchera ‘Peach Flambe.’ Cascading from the pot is Ornamental Grass EverColor® ‘Eversheen,’ each green blade highlighted by a central yellow stripe.

Allium Globemaster

Allium – Show-Stopping Globes, Spheres, & Domes for Your Garden

As visitors stroll the display gardens at the farm, they often ask us about the plants they see in the borders and beds. No plants generate more questions than Alliums. Members of this genus are available in a broad range of colors – from various shades of purple to pink, true blue, yellow, and white, but the hallmark of this family of plants is a form that is both playful and utterly distinctive. Larger cultivars such as Alliums ‘Globemaster,’ form sizeable spheres (in this case 8-10” flower heads) that appear to float like balloons above other plants in the border. Smaller varieties including the delightful Drumstick Allium (Allium sphaerocephalon), produce lollipop-sized orbs on slender stems at a lower height.

The globe-shaped purple flower heads of Allium shown blossoming amid Salvia, Iris and Poppies in the June border.

Alliums are more commonly known as Flowering Onions, a pedestrian name unworthy of these remarkable plants.

Allium caeruleum is a standout for both its color and its form.

It’s worth mentioning that Alliums, like Daffodils, are deer and rodent resistant, thanks to their faint oniony scent. The odor is not noticeable above the ground unless the leaves are cut or bruised, and many of the flowers have an enchanting, sweet scent. There are hundreds of species within this under-appreciated genus, and we annually struggle to restrain ourselves to a reasonable selection. They are reliable perennials when they get good drainage and plenty of sun.

The flower clusters of Allium roseum bulbiferum are less dense than some other cultivars, the pink florets and airy habit adding a graceful presence to the sunny border.

Using Alliums in the Garden

Alliums offer colorful, distinctive, and long-lasting flower forms that are standouts in the early summer garden (there are some fall bloomers as well). They love sun and prefer a well-drained, even sandy, soil as long as it has sufficient nutrients. Tuck the bulbs around clumps of summer-flowering perennials where the Alliums’ withering foliage will be hidden by the expanding perennials. Some combinations we use at the nursery include Allium ‘Globemaster’ among Echinacea (Purple Coneflower); Allium sphaerocephalon (the Drumstick Allium) with Yarrow, Asiatic Lilies, or Phlox; and Allium cristophii (Star of Persia) with Salvia ‘May Night,’ Alchemilla mollis (Lady’s Mantle), or Roses. We offer 5 varieties of the shorter Alliums (10–30″ tall) as A Big Mix of Little Alliums. They look best along the edge of a shrub border or planted in front of late-blooming perennials.

Our popular Red Highlights Collection pairs Drumstick Allium with the reddish-yellow flower clusters of Achillea (Yarrow) ‘Paprika.’

How to Care for Your Allium Bulbs

Light/Watering: Most Alliums grow best in full sun, with at least 6-8 hours of direct sunlight a day. Those we offer require well-drained soil and are longest lived in locations where the soil is on the dry side during summer dormancy.

The large white globes of Allium ‘Mount Everest” are a super choice for a white garden.

Planting: Plant Alliums more shallowly than comparably sized bulbs, just one to two times the diameter of the bulb deep.

Fertilizer/Soil and pH: Alliums prefer well-drained, fertile soil. Fertilize in fall and spring with any bulb fertilizer.

Continuing Care: The leaf tips of many varieties, especially the tall ones, begin to brown before bloom time. Remove the spent flowers (except from varieties that are sterile, such as ‘Globemaster’) if you wish to prevent them from self-sowing.

Pests/Diseases: Alliums have few problems except when planted too shallowly or in wet soil.

Companions: Place Alliums behind heavy-foliage plants such as Peonies and Iris. Good for bedding, and in mixed borders. Flower heads are good for drying.

Alliums pair beautifully with a wide variety of perennials including Echinacea (Coneflower), Phlox, Alchemilla mollis (Lady’s Mantle), Achillea (Yarrow), and Iris. Peonies are another excellent choice. Here a purple-flowering Allium pairs with a white-flowering Peony.

Dividing/Transplanting: Alliums rarely need transplanting or dividing, but this can be done when the bulbs are dormant.

Planting and Growing Bearded Iris

Flamboyant blooms on stately, splendid plants grace the garden in June. Bearded Irises are available in a veritable rainbow of colors, from vibrant primaries, to subtle bicolors and gentle pastels. Breeders have introduced a variety of reblooming Irises, which have a tendency to flower again from late summer into fall depending on climate and growing conditions. Please note that Bearded Irises may not bloom the first year after planting.

Light/Watering: Full sun and well-drained soil are important for vigorous growth and flowering. Do not overwater, as too much moisture in the soil can cause the rhizomes (roots) to rot, but do water deeply during summer drought. Consistent watering is especially important for reblooming Irises.

Bicolor ‘Fashion Queen’ contrasts bright apricot standards against violet purple falls with tangerine beards.

Fertilizer/Soil and pH: Iris will not tolerate soils that are wet in winter. Good drainage is important all year, and a pH near neutral (7.0) is preferred. In climates with very hot summers, plant the rhizome just below the soil surface; in cooler climates, the top of the rhizome should be exposed. Do not mulch around the rhizome as this practice may encourage rot. Fertilize in early spring with an all-purpose fertilizer scratched in around the plants, avoiding direct contact with the rhizome. Reblooming Irises perform best if fertilized again after the first wave of flowering is finished.

Pests/Diseases: The Iris borer, the worst pest of these lovely plants, overwinters as eggs in spent leaves, so don’t give the critters a hiding place. The borers emerge in the spring as tiny caterpillars, which spend a couple of weeks boring through the leaves down into the rhizome, where they grow fat and cause great damage, often leading to soft rot that causes even more damage. Vigilance can help—it’s actually possible to kill the borers in situ if you catch them early enough. You’ll see vertical streaks in the leaves; that’s your guide to help you squash the pests. If you see any signs of rot in the rhizome, dig it up and remove the affected parts. Unless the infestation is severe, plants usually recover, or grow lustily enough that you can salvage healthy chunks to keep growing. The rhizomes may also become infected with soft rot. Well-drained soils are important, so add sand if your soil is heavy and plant so that the top of the rhizome is above the soil line. If soft rot does occur, dig out and discard affected rhizomes and cut away any smaller areas of damage.

There are a number of Bearded Iris that have the tendency to bloom gloriously in June, then flower again in late summer and into fall. Our sampler offers an excellent introduction to this worthy group.

Companions: Irises are at their best in the company of other perennials, especially LiliesHerbaceous PeoniesRoses, and Oriental Poppies. Be careful to leave enough room between plants to provide for good air circulation.

Reflowering: Remove spent blooms consistently; Bearded Irises will flower sequentially on buds spaced along the stems. After blooming is finished, cut flower stems down at their base. Although reblooming varieties have a tendency to rebloom, sending up new fans that sport flower spikes as they mature later in the season, they are not guaranteed to bloom a second time. Repeat bloom is dependent on many things, including geographic location and growing conditions.

Dividing/Transplanting: Divide your Irises when the clump becomes crowded and bloom diminishes, usually every 3 to 4 years. The timing of division is very different than that of most perennials, because Bearded Irises go dormant shortly after flowering, and summer is the ideal time to dig up the rhizomes. Even though reblooming Irises don’t go dormant, this is also the correct time to divide those varieties. Break the rhizomes into pieces or cut them with a sharp knife. Select divisions with healthy fans of leaves, most likely from the outermost part of the plant. Discard the crowded interior pieces, and any that show signs of soft rot; dispose of these in the trash, not in the compost. This is the time to trim the leaves back to about 6 inches in length. Some gardeners like to dust the cut surfaces with powdered sulfur, or to dunk rhizomes in a solution of 1 part bleach to 10 parts water. We haven’t found this step necessary, but it might be advisable if you have had problems with rot. Replant promptly. You will probably find yourself with extra divisions you can share with friends.

Introduced in 2008, Tall Bearded Iris ‘Raptor Red’ brings luscious color to the June garden. Its well-branched stems hold plenty of these bicolor red blooms with a dab of mustard on their beards.

End-of-Season Care: After hard frost in the fall, cut foliage back hard, remove any foliage that appears spotted or yellowed and dispose of all debris in the trash. We recommend winter protection in cold climates, especially for the first winter after planting. We suggest covering the rhizomes with an inch or two of sand topped with a light layer of evergreen boughs, applied after the ground freezes and removed when the Forsythias bloom the following spring.

Calendar of Care

Early Spring: Diligently remove and destroy any old foliage to allow for fresh, new growth and prevent Iris borers from emerging as the weather warms. Remove any winter mulch. Feed plants with an all-purpose fertilizer scratched in around the plants, avoiding direct contact with the rhizome.

Mid-Spring: Watch vigilantly for the telltale signs of Iris borers in the foliage — dark vertical lines that may appear watery show up in the leaves. Squash the bugs where they live; if infestation is severe, remove affected foliage completely and destroy.

Pastel shades of yellow and blue combine in Iris ‘Easter Candy’.

Late Spring: Taller forms may need staking. Deadhead as flowers fade, and cut entire flower spikes down at the base when blooming is finished. Fertilize reblooming varieties again after the first wave of flowering is through.

Summer: If plants need dividing, complete this task after flowering finishes and then trim the foliage back to six inches. Water divisions well during dry periods.

Fall: After hard frost in the fall, cut foliage back hard, remove any foliage that appears spotted or yellowed, and dispose of all debris in the trash. Winter protection in cold climates is recommended, especially for the first winter after planting. After the ground freezes, cover the rhizomes with an inch or two of sand topped with a light layer of evergreen boughs; remove when the Forsythias bloom the following spring.

Long-Season Hummingbird Garden

Invite Hummingbirds to the Garden

Hummingbirds are enchanting visitors to any garden. Small, fast, and as aerially sophisticated as helicopters, they zip around, feeding at nectar-rich blossoms. By planting the natural food sources they prefer, you’re sure to welcome these delightful little birds to your garden. Hummingbird feeders are another great way to entice them to your yard, and they’ll begin to investigate these as a possible new food source. Below are some of our favorite perennial plants and products, all of which will entice these remarkable flyers.

Monarda ‘Raspberry Wine’

Hummingbirds are drawn to the brilliantly colored, bright magenta-red blossoms of Monarda ‘Raspberry Wine.’ These plants bloom long and hard and show excellent resistance to powdery mildew. A member of the Mint family, this vigorous Bee Balm will spread. Divide plants in spring and share with friends. A White Flower Farm introduction in 1992.

Asclepias ‘Cinderella’

Of the 200 species in the genus Asclepias, the best known are North American wildflowers. They have small, curiously shaped blooms that appear in dense clusters. Asclepias ‘Cinderella’ is a genuine star with unusually dense clusters of pale pink flowers that open from dark pink buds. The vanilla-scented flowers last well in winter and attract butterflies and hummingbirds.

Agastache ‘Blue Fortune’

Agastache is a genus of about 30 aromatic species native to central and eastern Asia, Mexico, and the United States. Careful breeding and selection have given us newcomers that offer exceptional garden performance and a long season of bloom. Robust Agastache ‘Blue Fortune’ produces a mass of soft powder-blue flower spikes from July onwards, making it a magnet for butterflies and admiring visitors alike.

Lonicera ‘Major Wheeler’

Bring on the hummingbirds! Lonicera ‘Major Wheeler’ produces a blanket of tubular, reddish orange flowers (coral shades on the West Coast) from late spring through summer. Later, the red berries attract goldfinches and robins. It’s a selection of our native species, Lonicera sempervirens, and plants are both carefree and noninvasive.

Hand-Painted Hummingbird Feeder

In addition to enchanting us with their aerial acrobatics, hummingbirds can be a beneficial presence in the garden. A great way to encourage them to take up residence or visit often is to utilize hummingbird feeders. Our Hand-Painted Hummingbird Feeder is made in Mexico from recycled green glass that’s hand-blown in the shape of a blossom then painted by artists. Each brightly colored, beautifully constructed nectar feeder is secured by a metal stand that pushes easily into the ground.

 

Summer Garden To-Do List

During the hot and hazy mid-summer, the list of garden chores is whittled down to a few: watering, deadheading, watering, weeding, and watering.

If you are fortunate enough to be able to water, it’s a great idea to invest in a timer. Whether you prefer a simple mechanical timer or a more elaborate digital one, you can set the timer before you leave for work in the morning, so you water in the coolest part of the day. That wastes less water through evaporation. The theory is that water will evaporate, much like dew, and be less likely to cause fungal problems than night-time watering. We try to drag the sprinkler and hose into position the evening before.

Haws Watering Can

Most plants need an inch or two a week of water. In the garden, it’s better to deliver a single deep soaking than dribble a little water every day. Deep watering encourages roots to drive deep, making the plants less susceptible to wilting. Plants in containers may need watering daily – even twice a day. Check the soil first, though – overwatering is the biggest cause of death for container plants. The soil should be allowed to dry out a bit between waterings, although not so much that plants wilt.

Weeding in the garden utilizing our Tub Trug, Perfect Garden Gloves and Garden Hat.

Most gardeners wouldn’t rank weeding as their most pleasurable task, but because it’s something that must be done, it’s best to make it as easy as possible. There is an array of top quality tools designed to help eradicate weeds of various types in a variety of locations. An Easy-Glide Garden Hoe works beautifully in borders and the Tight Spots Weeding Tool dislodges weeds that find their way into crevices and cracks. In addition to having the right tools and supplies (like a good Trug to haul away weeds), our advice is to weed after it rains or after a good watering. The roots of most weeds yield more easily when the ground is moist.

Shaped like a small harpoon, this remarkable tool is designed to help gardeners remove weeds from around the bases of perennials and shrubs without damaging those valuable garden plants.

Although deadheading can be a tedious task, it is one that is necessary and will reward you in the end. This will help keep your garden looking fresh and tidy. However,  another important benefit of deadheading is to help produce blooms for the rest of the growing season. The process of deadheading includes removing spent flowers, either with hand pruners or the tips of your fingers by pinching off the tips of the plant. By doing this, taking care to remove the ovaries,  you are helping redirect energy back into the plant. This will help to encourage another flush of flowers in many perennials. Leaving you with a longer period of time to enjoy the flowers and blossoms in your garden.