Months of Houseplants
Months of Houseplants

Months of Houseplants

$139.00
0 Reviews
Write a Review
Choose how many months of plants to send:
Choose when you want to send the first plant:
Add to wishlist

Product Details

Product Details

Our selection of choice and unusual houseplants and complete kits reflects years of experience and is guaranteed to please. During the winter, we watch the weather closely and ship at precisely the right moment to assure safe arrival. Your gift will be delivered in superb condition with full instructions for care included. Twelve separate shipments, sent by standard delivery to one address only.

  • January -- An Amaryllis (our selection) potted in a 7" wicker basket and ready to begin growing on arrival
  • February -- A complete kit for forcing Lily-of-the-Valley (12 pips, 6" terra-cotta long tom pot with saucer, and potting soil)
  • March -- German Primrose (Primula obconica Libre Magenta) in a 6" basket
  • April -- Gardenia in a 6" white cachepot
  • May -- Cape Primrose (Streptocarpella 'Concord Blue') in a 6" basket
  • June -- Yellow Flowering Maple (Abutilon pictum 'Thompsonii') in a 7 1/4" gray bamboo cachepot
  • July -- Lavender 'Goodwin Creek Grey' in a 7" glazed cachepot with saucer
  • August -- Pink Anthurium in a 6" cream-colored embossed metal cachepot
  • September -- Plectranthus 'Mona Lavender' in a 7" glazed ceramic pot with saucer
  • October -- Dwarf Chenille (Acalypha pendula) in a 6" woven basket
  • November -- Blush Holiday Cactus in a 6-inch woven basket
  • December -- Paperwhite 'Ziva' with a complete kit for forcing (12 bulbs, 10" bulb pan, 11" woven basket, potting soil, and stem support)

Shipping

Shipping

HOW PLANTS ARE SHIPPED

The size of the plants we ship has been selected to reduce the shock of transplanting. For some, this means a large, bareroot crown. Others cannot travel bareroot or transplant best if grown in containers. We ship these perennials and annuals in 1 pint pots, except as noted. We must point out that many perennials will not bloom the first year after planting, but will the following year, amply rewarding your patience. We ship bulbs as dormant, bare bulbs, sometimes with some wood shavings or moss. Shrubs, Roses, vines, and other woody plants may be shipped bareroot or in pots. The size of the pot is noted in the quick facts for each item.

WHEN WE SHIP

We ship our bulbs and plants at the right time for planting in your area, except as noted, with orders dispatched on a first-come, first-served basis by climate zone. Estimated dates for shipping are indicated in the Shipping Details box for each item. Please refer to the Shipping Details box to determine the earliest shipping time. Unless you specify otherwise, fertilizers, tools, and other non-plant items are shipped with your plants or bulbs. Please supply a street address for delivery. Kindly contact us with two weeks notice, if you'll be away at expected time of delivery.

OUR GUARANTEE

We guarantee to ship plants that are in prime condition for growing. If your order is damaged or fails to meet your expectations, we will cheerfully replace or refund it. Please contact our Customer Service Department at 1-800-503-9624 or email us at [email protected]. Please include your order number or customer number when contacting us.

Reviews

Reviews

There are no reviews yet. Be first to Write a Review.

Growing guide

Growing guide

GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS:

Light: Most houseplants prefer bright light with some direct sun. East- and west-facing windows are ideal and a south-facing window is satisfactory if the plants are not against the glass.

Temperature: Most are content at 60–70°F. Please note that sunny windowsills which are not well ventilated can get extremely warm on bright days.

Humidity: All houseplants (except Cacti) resent the excessively dry air produced by radiators, hot-air vents, wood stoves and close to south-facing windows. Humidity should be provided by standing the plants on trays of moist pebbles, or by using a humidifier nearby.

Watering: This is an art that can be learned. The secret is to poke your index finger into the potting soil. If it is dry one inch down from the surface, water thoroughly and don’t water until it is dry again. If the soil shrinks away from the edge of the pot, it is too dry and root damage is likely to occur. If soil remains constantly wet the roots will rot. When this occurs some leaves may turn brown or yellow.

Feeding: Houseplants generally need plant food only when actively growing. This is usually in spring and summer. All flowering houseplants prefer a plant food that is low in nitrogen and high in phosphorus. We suggest applying fertilizer at half the rate listed on the container, but at the same frequency.

Potting: The potting soil we supply with some plants should be moistened, but not soaked, before using. When it is time to repot use a good potting soil recommended for houseplants, avoiding bargain brands. Water well before potting. Remove the plant by turning it upside down and tapping the edge of the pot against a solid object. Use a pot that is 1–2 inches larger or return it to the same pot by carefully removing about an inch of the soil and roots. At the same time trim the foliage by one third. Please note: this treatment is not recommended for Clivia. Add compost gradually and firm the soil. Settle the soil by tapping the base of the pot. After potting, water well, but avoid washing out the fresh compost.

Pests: Most plants have few problems when properly cared for, but there will be situations that require some treatment. Wait until the plant is not in flower. The safest method is to drown the insects with tepid water using the sprayer in a kitchen sink. Make sure not to soak the soil too much. If this doesn’t work plunge the foliage in a bucket of soapy water, using liquid soap, not detergent. If this fails try mixing 2 ounces of rubbing alcohol, 2 tablespoons Ivory Liquid Soap and enough water to make a quart. Apply with a sprayer that can produce a strong spray to dislodge the critters, taking care to hit the underside of the leaves and the growing tips. Commercial houseplant sprays are available if severe infestations occur.

Summer Treatment: Most houseplants prefer to be outside during the summer. It is critical to place them in a shady location for 2–3 weeks before you expose them to full sun. You must return them indoors as soon as night temperatures drop below 45°F.

Trimming: Trimming will be necessary for vigorous varieties during growing season.

Other gardeners also viewed
Email Sign Up

Subscribe to enjoy gardening advice, email offers & more