Growing Hibiscus (Hibiscus)

Latin Name Pronunciation: hye-bis'kus  

Hibiscus is a huge genus of more than 200 species which includes a diverse bunch of annuals, perennials, and shrubs, both tender and hardy.

Rose of Sharon

A shrub valued for its late summer bloom. It enjoys full sun and average garden soil that drains well. Space 4–8′ apart, depending on the variety. Prune in early spring. It may take two or three years to begin flowering. Medium growth rate of 12–24″ yearly, depending on growing conditions.

Swamp-rose Mallow (Rose Mallow)

A hardy perennial plant growing to 3–4′. It wants full sun and evenly moist, organically rich soil. Space 2–3′ apart. It is one of the latest plants to break dormancy in spring, often not appearing until late May or early June, so be sure to mark its location carefully to avoid disturbing it before it begins to grow. Stems may be cut down to ground level either in fall, or in early spring.

Tropical Hibiscus

Grow in full sun for best foliage color; plants may require staking if grown in partial shade, and their color will be less vibrant. (Plants grow best in the partial shade in the West.) Plant in moist but well drained soil. Pinch plants to encourage them to be bushy and more compact. Feed every 2 weeks with a water soluble, 15-30-15 fertilizer, which is formulated specifically for annuals. Hardy to Zone 10 (30°F) but not long lived. Plants can be overwintered indoors in a sunny, south-facing window.

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