Growing Iris sibirica & Iris chrysographes black-flowered (Siberian Iris)

Latin Name Pronunciation: eye'riss 

Choose a site in a sunny area where the soil is evenly moist. Siberian Iris will tolerate partial shade, and established plants will withstand dry spells, but full sun and moist soil yield the best results. Partial shade is required in warm inland areas of the West. Note that plants may grow so large in 4–5 years that moving or dividing them becomes difficult.

Using a trowel or shovel, dig the planting holes, spacing them according to the suggestions provided on your labels or cultural sheet. Set the roots in the holes, push soil back into the holes, covering the tops of the somewhat woody rhizomes with no more than 1″ of soil. Firm the soil by pushing down with both hands to eliminate air pockets. Finally, water thoroughly.

Please note: Bareroot plants dry out quickly once they are removed from their packaging. We strongly recommend that you keep the roots covered with packing material until you are ready to plant.

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